Do Carbohydrates Make You Fat?

food-sandwich“To learn about health, one must study health”
- Albert Einstein

There are few topics in the health and fitness community that are as controversial as carbohydrate consumption. While low-carb dieters sometimes claim that a high carbohydrate intake drives insulin resistance, weight gain and obesity, dietitians and proponents of low-fat diets on the other end of the spectrum often say that everyone should get 40-60% of their daily energy from carbohydrate to fuel the body. In this post I’ll take a step back and look at macronutrient intake in an evolutionary perspective and then discuss carbohydrate consumption in the context of overweight and obesity…

Read more from my guest post at BretContreras.com


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Comments

  1. senthilkumar says:

    This article is very useful

    • Eirik Garnas says:

      Glad you liked it! Subscribe in the sidebar if you want to receive new posts in your e-mail right after they are published.

      I also recommend that you follow bretcontreras.com if you want great info on strength and conditioning.

Trackbacks

  1. low carb diet

    Do Carbohydrates Make You Fat?

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